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Eating veggie » Nutritional advice » Vitamin D

Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps the body take in calcium. It helps bones and teeth stay strong, and muscles working properly.

All about vitamin D

What foods have vitamin D?

Some good sources of vitamin D include:

  • EGG YOLK
  • CEREALS
  • SOYA MILK
  • MUSHROOMS (E.G. WILD AND LIGHT-CULTIVATED MUSHROOMS)
  • FAT SPREADS
  • SUPPLEMENTS

How much vitamin D do I need?

Average requirements are:

Infants less than 1 year:

  • 8.5μg to 10μg per day

Children aged 1 to 3:

  • 10μg per day

Children over 4 years, and adults:

  • 10μg per day

[μg = micrograms]

  • The recommended dose for adults including pregnant and breastfeeding women is 10 micrograms

Vitamin D hints and tips

  • Vitamin D comes from sunlight and some foods. It is difficult to get enough vitamin D from a balanced diet.
  • In the UK, it is recommended everyone consider taking a vitamin D supplement especially from October to late March. However, people whose skin has little or no exposure to the sun need to take a supplement throughout the year.
  • Some vitamin D in foods and supplements is from non-vegetarian sources, so check the label.

More about vitamin D

Vitamin D influences calcium absorption and ensures continuous mineralisation of bones and teeth by supporting calcium blood levels. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is produced by the action of sunlight on our skin and found in animal products such as eggs and some fortified products. Vitamin D(ergocalciferol) is derived from plant sources and used in fortified products. For most people the recommended exposure to sunlight provides adequate levels of vitamin D. In the UK, groups at risk of vitamin D deficiency are pregnant women, people receiving < 15 minutes a day exposure to the sun on face and forearms, older people, ethnic groups wearing enveloping clothes and people with dark skin colour. Excessive intakes of vitamin D can cause excessive absorption of calcium which can damage the kidneys.

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